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August 2015 Archives

What can I actually discharge through Chapter 7 bankruptcy?

For most people, Chapter 7 bankruptcy is synonymous with a full discharge of any and all debts. While that would indeed be nice, there are some debts that cannot be discharged through a Chapter 7. Although this might be disappointing to some who are filing for bankruptcy, for those who truly need debt relief, it is often still a viable and appropriate option.

Take control of your debt with Chapter 13

Have you ever thought "If I could just catch a break on these few different bills, I could get caught up?" This thought process might be more common than you think, and there is a legal course of action that can help that thought come to life. When the debt, monthly payments and constant phone calls interfere with a person's honest yearning to simply pay bills, Chapter 13 bankruptcy can be a viable option.

Mystery pricing systems contribute to medical debt

Virtually everyone in Washington understands the steep costs of medical care, but getting an exact number rather than a ballpark estimate can difficult. Medical debt is an enormous contributor to overwhelming financial burdens, and yet many patients are never told what the end cost will be for a procedure, treatment or visit with specialist. Without knowing what they will end up owing for necessary care, it can be surprisingly easy to fall into a seemingly endless pit of medical debt.

Will bankruptcy really give me relief from bill collectors?

Dealing with creditors and debt collectors can be one of the most traumatizing aspects of being in severe debt. Some Washington debtors may even begin to fear incoming phone calls out of worry of who might be on the other end. For those in serious need of debt relief, bankruptcy does more than just them help handle overwhelming debt -- it can also provides relief from bill collectors.

Chapter 7 bankruptcy makes most debts unenforceable

Personal bankruptcies are generally achieved through two types of filings: Chapter 7 and Chapter 13. A Chapter 7 bankruptcy is a liquidation bankruptcy, while a Chapter 13 bankruptcy is a reorganizational bankruptcy. Regardless of the type for which a Washington resident files, debts that are discharged when the bankruptcy is finalized become unenforceable for creditors.